Carolyn Wilhelm reviews The True Nature of Tarot — 10th Anniversary Edition

The True Nature of Tarot caught my eye not because I wanted to learn how to read the cards. I do not plan on being a reader or seeker for the Tarot. However, you may have heard of Tarot cards in movies, books, and conversations like me. What is it? How does it work? I just wanted to understand the process at a basic level. When the death card is pulled in a film, there is a closeup, scary music plays, and – cut scene. But is that card what the movie or book implies?

For instance, I read the book Wheel of Fortune by Theodore Jerome Cohen. I had no idea when I began reading it that a Tarot card played prominently in the plot.  According to Wing, the Wheel of Fortune card implies something good is coming, but you cannot simply wait. Or, it might indicate someone who wants to have it all. Of course, she provides more detailed information.

In the Poldark series, Agatha read Tarot cards. They are mentioned in many thriller mysteries and James Bond movies. I began feeling like I should learn more about these cards. It is probably past time.

Here are the discussion questions for this book if you read with a book club or reading friends.

  1. How many cards are in a deck? There are all sorts of decks on Amazon, for instance, that have different amounts of cards. Is there a correct number?
  2. Do Tarot cards predict the future? Do they tell people’s fortunes? Why or why not?
  3. Can you cast a spell using Tarot cards or cause good or bad things to happen to other people? Are the messages in the cards always positive? Why might negative messages hold valuable lessons?
  4. Should people make decisions based on a Tarot card reading? Is there an easy way to make a life decision using Tarot? Does the reader have the power to determine a person’s fate?
  5. What is a psychic? Did you realize all people and things have energy fields? How does a psychic pick up information about the seeker?
  6. Do the psychic and seeker have to be in the same room for a reading?
  7. Why should a seeker not take a friend or relative to a reading, even if privacy is not an issue? What can happen?
  8. How do colors, fabrics, and surroundings affect a reading? Why might a reader wear black?
  9. What is the three-step grounding method? Did you try to dump, ground, and protect yourself? If so, how did it feel?
  10. Does one Tarot deck fit all?
  11. Why is psychic development expected to take a lifetime?
  12. Why does Wing wave her right hand over a deck of cards? What can she feel? Why does she have several different decks?
  13. Are cards read left to right, like reading a book? How are they spread and read?
  14. What rules does a responsible Tarot reader adhere to, such as confidentiality and sharing sensitive information about the seeker?
  15. What should a seeker do if a reader claims to have a curse or dark cloud above them and wants money to remove it?
  16. Are readings held if the reading often confirms what the subject already knows or feels to be accurate?
  17. Why does Wing say Tarot can show the seeker deeper aspects of themselves that would otherwise take years to reveal?
  18. What are the top four highly misunderstood cards in the major arcana?
  19. Should the reader and seeker hope for a particular outcome?
  20. Wing says the light symbolizes inner wisdom and, in this state, ego is no longer needed. What does this mean?

I learned enough to realize Tarot is a complicated subject and that there is much to learn. I just wanted to know more about the topic. Other people might read The True Nature of Tarot to learn to be readers. This book provides an entire course.

Reviewer,
Carolyn Wilhelm B.S., M.A., and M.S.

U.P. Reader -- Volume #5 [HC]

SKU 978-1-61599-572-1
$28.95
: Bringing Upper Michigan Literature to the World
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Michigan's Upper Peninsula is blessed with a treasure trove of storytellers, poets, and historians, all seeking to capture a sense of Yooper Life from settler's days to the far-flung future. Since 2017, the U.P. Reader offers a rich collection of their voices that embraces the U.P.'s natural beauty and way of life, along with a few surprises.

The forty-one short works in this fifth annual volume take readers on U.P. road and boat trips from the Keweenaw to the Soo. Every page is rich with descriptions of the characters and culture that make the Upper Peninsula worth living in and writing about. U.P. writers span genres from humor to history and from science fiction to poetry. This issue also includes imaginative fiction from the Dandelion Cottage Short Story Award winners, honoring the amazing young writers enrolled in all of the U.P.'s schools.

Featuring the words of Karen Dionne, Barbara Bartel, T. Marie Bertineau, Don Bodey, Craig A. Brockman, Stephanie Brule, Larry Buege, Tricia Carr, Deborah K. Frontiera, Elizabeth Fust, Robert Grede, Charles Hand, Kathy Johnson, Sharon Kennedy, Chris Kent, Tamara Lauder, Teresa Locknane, Ellen Lord, Becky Ross Michael, Hilton Moore, Gretchen Preston, Donna Searight Simons, Frank Searight, T. Kilgore Splake, Ninie G. Syarikin, Tyler Tichelaar, Brandy Thomas, Donna Winters, Annabell Danker, Kyra Holmgren, Nicholas Painer, and Walter Dennis.

"Funny, wise, or speculative, the essays, memoirs, and poems found in the pages of these profusely illustrated annuals are windows to the history, soul, and spirit of both the exceptional land and people found in Michigan's remarkable U.P. If you seek some great writing about the northernmost of the state's two peninsulas look around for copies of the U.P. Reader. --Tom Powers, Michigan in Books

"U.P. Reader offers a wonderful mix of storytelling, poetry, and Yooper culture. Here's to many future volumes!" --Sonny Longtine, author of Murder in Michigan's Upper Peninsula

"As readers embark upon this storied landscape, they learn that the people of Michigan's Upper Peninsula offer a unique voice, a tribute to a timeless place too long silent." --Sue Harrison, international bestselling author of Mother Earth Father Sky

"I was amazed by the variety of voices in this volume. U.P. Reader offers a little of everything, from short stories to nature poetry, fantasy to reality, Yooper lore to humor. I look forward to the next issue." --Jackie Stark, editor, Marquette Monthly

The U.P. Reader is sponsored by the Upper Peninsula Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA) a non-profit 501(c)3 corporation. A portion of proceeds from each copy sold will be donated to the UPPAA for its educational programming.

Learn more at www.UPReader.org

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