Why we’re “pre-wired” for anxiety – with Fred Zelinger

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Please Explain “Anxiety” to Me (Audiobook Edition)

Humans have always experienced anxiety as a defense mechanism to danger, says Fred Zelinger, a Cedarhurst psychologist. “Anxiety is fundamentally a survival need. If something worries us, we end up doing something to be safe, to avoid the danger,” he says.

But it’s no longer a sabre-toothed tiger that’s the threat, Zelinger says. Now it’s COVID-19, and the “doing something” might be frantically searching for hand sanitizer or stocking up on food in case of a quarantine.

“Will I be safe?’ That’s what this is all about,” agrees Deborah Serani, a psychologist in Smithtown who teaches at Adelphi University. Catastrophizing–mentally jumping right to the worst-case scenario–is at the root of much of this fear, Serani says. “You want to be reasonable with your thinking.”

Reasoned planning and adjustments to daily life are positive ways to manage fear, Zelinger says. “You want to regain a sense of control.”

Mary Czaja, 62, of Bay Shore, who is on disability with osteoarthritis, says she is taking some precautions such as avoiding crowds, but she’s also not “freaking out.” “I have a healthy respect for what’s going on,” Czaja says. “You always respect your enemies. The virus is the enemy.”

Read the entire article on Newsday

Sam Feels Better Now!:

SKU 978-1-932690-60-6
$12.95
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Sam saw something awful and scary! Ms. Carol, a special therapist, will show Sam how to feel better. Children can help Sam feel better too by using drawings, play, and storytelling activities. They will be able to identify and manage their own feelings and difficulties intheir lives following a traumatic event.

Therapists' Acclaim for Sam Feels Better Now

"This beautiful little picture book is the ideal guide for a series of therapy sessions that will focus the child's attention on positives and help to deal with the traumatic memories"
-- Bob Rich, PhD., AnxietyAndDepression-help.com

"Sam Feels Better Now" provides the child and therapist a safe metaphor for exploring trauma issues. The story teaches children that coming to therapy can be a good thing."
--JoAnna White, Ed.D., Professor and Chair Department of Counseling and Psychological Services, Georgia State Univ.

Visit the author online: www.JillOsborne.com

Book #2 in the Growing with Love Series

From Loving Healing Press www.LovingHealing.com
"Redefining what's possible for healing mind and spirit since 2003."

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